Student Affairs

Disability Support Services

A person walking on a bridge with three people holding up the bridge underneath

Welcome to Disability Support Services (DSS) at Green River Community College. We look forward to meeting you and providing you with exemplary services. Each year, we assist over 600 qualified students with Physical, Learning, Sensory, Cognitive and/or Psychological disabilities by identifying and coordinating reasonable accommodations for equal access to academic programs and activities.

You are welcome to visit DSS at any time during your enrollment at Green River; however, it is recommended that you come to our office once you have registered for classes to discuss services and academic accommodations.

Mission

DSS works with qualified students with disabilities in a confidential, respectful, and safe environment to identify and develop reasonable classroom accommodations; to ensure equal opportunity and access of academic and professional goals; and to promote an accessible community where students with disabilities have equal opportunity to participate in college programs and activities.

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To receive this information in an alternative format, please contact DSS at 253.833.9111, (ext. 2631) or TDD 253.288.3359.

Green River does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, disability, marital status, religion, age or any other unlawful basis in its programs or activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies:

Vice President of Human Resources
12401 SE 320th Street
Auburn, WA 98092
253.288.3320

 

Students

Veterans

Welcome Veterans! Thank you for your service to our country!

Disability Support Services (DSS) is here to explore with you appropriate accommodations to make the campus environment accessible and ease your transition to the classroom. Individualized accommodations and support services are provided for wounded warriors. Students work with the DSS Director in a CONFIDENTIAL meeting to develop a Letter of Accommodation (LOA). Please see the procedures for obtaining accommodations and documentation guidelines below.

Note: Veteran's transcripts and records do not identify whether or not a student received accommodations from DSS.

Contact DSS

Procedure for Obtaining Accommodations

  1. Register for Classes
  2. Contact DSS to schedule an appointment
  3. Obtain historical and/or recent documentation of your disability
  4. Review and discuss documentation with DSS Director
  5. Develop Letter of Accommodation with DSS Director
  6. Provide and discuss Letter of Accommodation with Instructors

Note: Some accommodations (e.g. interpreting services, text in alternative format [Braille, e-text], textbooks on audiotape, enlarged print, etc.) require substantial advance (15 to 30 working days or more) notice. Therefore, it is the responsibility of the prospective or enrolled student to give sufficient early notice of such accommodation to DSS each quarter the student is enrolled in order to ensure timely coordination and availability of equipment, items, and/or services.

As soon as you have registered for classes, begin planning for accommodations for an academic quarter by contacting DSS.

Overview of Services

Examples of Auxiliary Aids or Services provided by DSSServices not provided by DSS
Extended Time on Exams Tutoring/Individual Instruction
Special Location for Testing Personal Aides or Attendants
Use of Adaptive Equipment and Assistive Technology Personal Device or Equipment (e.g. eyeglasses, wheelchairs, hearing aids, etc.)
Note-Taking Assistance Diagnostic Testing for Learning Disability
Alternately Formatted Textbooks Transportation Services
Supportive Chairs Guide Animals
Sign Language Interpreters Extended Time on Assignments

Eligibility for DSS services

To be eligible for disability related services, students must have a disability as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and request to be accommodated. Under the ADA and Section 504, a person has a disability if s/he has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities (e.g., walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, standing, breathing, learning, and working).

Documentation Guidelines

Documentation of a disability must be generated by a medical or professional expert in the related field of disability and submitted in writing to Disability Support Services (DSS) where it will be kept in a separate, confidential file.

Please click on the disability below for Green River documentation guidelines or see our General Guidelines.

K-12 Transition: For individuals who have recently been receiving services from a public school system, the information requested would most likely be contained in the Psycho-Educational Evaluation report from your most recent triennial review. Some of the information may also be contained in an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), 504 Plan, or Transition Plan. Check the information against the guidelines above.

Documentation will be assessed on a case by case basis and must include a diagnosis, names and results of tests administered (if appropriate), and a statement of how the disability impacts the student in an educational setting.

Green River does not provide diagnostic testing for learning disabilities. The DSS office can provide you a list of Learning Disability evaluators and diagnosticians; however, we do not make any recommendations or referrals to any one specific person or company.

Intake Interview

Students with disabilities requesting academic accommodations are required to complete an Intake Interview with the Director of Disability Support Services (DSS). Please contact DSS at (253) 833-9111, ext. 2631, or by TDD at: (253) 288-3359 to schedule an appointment. If accommodations (e.g. ASL Interpreters) are needed for the Intake Interview please contact DSS one week prior to the interview.

The Intake Form can be completed by the student prior to the Intake Interview or it will be completed during the Intake Interview. Please complete the highlighted areas on the Intake Form and bring the form to the Intake Interview.

Click here to access the Intake Form.

Please also print and complete the Authorization for Release of Information (ARI) and bring to DSS at time of Intake Interview. The ARI allows DSS to request additional documentation on behalf of a student.

Click here to access the ARI.

Requesting Letters of Accommodation (LOA)

The Letter of Accommodation (LOA) Request Form must be completed by a qualified and registered student every quarter that they are requesting academic accommodations from Disability Support Services (DSS). Please fill out the LOA Request Form and submit it to DSS. A copy of the class schedule is not required when submitting LOA Request online.

Once a student's LOA Request Form has been received by DSS, copies of their LOA will be provided to the student. The student is responsible to give a copy to each instructor. The LOA is not activated until the student discusses the accommodations with his/her instructors. The LOA specifies which accommodations the student has qualified for and are intended to begin communication between the student and his/her instructor.

Click here to access the LOA Request Form.

Student Responsibilities

Students are responsible for requesting assistance for a disability from Disability Support Services (DSS) and providing medical documentation that diagnoses the condition and supports requested accommodations.

Each quarter a student is requesting academic accommodations a Letter of Accommodation (LOA) Request Form needs to be completed by the student and turned into DSS once the student has registered for classes. In turn, DSS will provide the LOA for the student to give to each instructor. This letter indicates which accommodations the student has qualified for and are intended to begin communication between the student and the instructor.

To activate a LOA the student will need to:

  1. Meet personally with each of their instructors and provide their LOA.
  2. Discuss and work with each instructor to determine the best method of providing accommodation(s) in specific situations/classes.
  3. Organize with instructor and if applicable, DSS, scheduled accommodations such as testing or field trips prior to when each occurs throughout the quarter.

During the Intake Interview, students will sign a Student Responsibility Form, which outlines their basic responsibilities regarding accommodations implementation.

Students are responsible for self-advocating and for contacting DSS in a timely manner when problems or questions arise about their accommodations or academic progress.

Forms

FormDescription
Intake Form Collection of personal information and medical data used in developing the student's Letter of Accommodation.
Letter of Accommodation Request Form Completed by a qualified and registered student every quarter that they are requesting academic accommodations from DSS.
Authorization for Release of Information Gives DSS written consent by the student to request their medical documentation.
Authorization for Release of Information Reverse Gives DSS written consent by the student to share information concerning them to a designated person.
Student Responsibilities Outlines the student's basic responsibilities regarding accommodations implementation.
Documentation Form for Disabilities Provides a description of the current functional impact of the disability on a specific student by appropriate medical or professional expert in addition to the diagnosis.

Requesting Documents from DSS

In order for DSS to send students' documentation to other colleges, programs, individuals, etc., students need to first contact the Public Information Office (PIO) to sign a consent form. PIO will then contact DSS with the student's request.

Public Information Office
Office: AD 17, Auburn Campus
Phone: 253.833.9111 ext. 3361
Fax: 253.288.3460

Volunteer Note-Taker Opportunities

ENHANCE your college experience by becoming a volunteer note-taker!

Position Description: A volunteer note-taker takes notes in instructional lecture or lab classes for students with disabilities who need assistance with capturing lectured materials.

Please contact DSS if you would like to learn more about being a volunteer note-taker. DSS is located in LSC 274 (253.833.9111 ext. 2631).

Click here for description of role, qualifications, and benefits of being a Note Taker.

Click here for a Green River Volunteer Application. Please turn in application to DSS (LSC 274).

Tips for Tutoring Students with disabilities

Click here for information on tutoring students with disabilities

Accommodations

Overview

It is Green River Community College's Policy to provide reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities with advance notice of need. If an accommodation is needed for any reason, please contact Disability Support Service (DSS) by phone (253.833-9111 ext. 2631), in person (LSC 274), or via email (dss@greenriver.edu).

Additionally, DSS provides qualified students an equal opportunity to participate in Green River's programs and services through reasonable accommodations. Listed below are examples of services provided but not limited to:

Testing

Disabilities affecting access to testing materials and/or testing process may qualify for testing accommodations. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that substantially affects test taking and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS).

Please Note: Testing accommodations are not intended to alter the construct of the test being measured or invalidate the results. Reasonable testing accommodations are changes made in the administration of the test in order to remove obstacles to the test-taking process that are presented by the disability without changing the constructs being tested.

This table outlines general information about testing accommodations but is not limited to:

Types of Test AccommodationsDescription
Extended Test Time The most frequent extended test time is time and a half. Certain circumstances warrant double time such as requiring alternative formats for text presentation (e.g. Braille, reader, or scribe). Extended time beyond double time requires specific direction from the medical professional in the related field of disability and consultation with the director of DSS.
Reader Students who qualify for a test in audio format are provided with a DSS reader who reads the test in person for a student.
Scribe Students whose disability affects writing or typing may be provided with a DSS scribe for tests.
Alternative Test Site

Students who use support services such as a scribe, reader, extended time, etc., or who qualify for an alternative test site can reserve the Testing Center's room 115 located in the Zgolinski Welcome Center (ZWC) to take tests. Students must contact DSS to reserve ZWC 115.

Note: The testing accommodation should not cause the student to miss instruction time.

Assistive Technology
(Alternative Format)
The DSS office can facilitate the use of adaptive equipment such as a closed circuit television (CCTV), a screen reader such as JAWS or Read Please, or voice recognition software such as Dragon Naturally Speaking for students who require assistive technology to complete a test.
Large Print
(Alternative Format)
When students require a large print to view the test, students should contact the instructor 3 to 4 days before the exam to discuss this accommodation.

Braille
(Alternative Format)

If a test is required to be formatted in Braille the student needs to contact the instructor and DSS 1 week before the exam.
Proctor Once the instructor has notified DSS that a proctor is required, DSS will schedule the proctor for the test.

Activating Testing Accommodations

  1. Schedule an appointment with the instructor early in the quarter to discuss extended test time and other accommodations outlined in the Letter of Accommodation (LOA).
  2. 3 to 4 days prior to each EACH test, organize test accommodations with the instructors.
  3. If applicable contact DSS 3 to 4 days prior to EACH test to request support services such as scribe, reader, etc. or to reserve ZWC 115.
  4. 2 days prior to the test confirm with the instructor the date, time, and place the exam will be taken.
Please Note:
  • If the instructor or DSS does not hear from a student 3 to 4 days prior to a test date, test accommodations may not be in place the day of the test.
  • If a test is not at the Testing Center or if the student misses an exam, the student is responsible for contacting the instructor to reschedule the exam. Once the student and instructor determine a new test date/time, the student is to contact DSS to reserve ZWC 115 and/or to organize support services.

Note-Taking

Disabilities affecting access to lecture material may qualify for note-taking accommodations. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that hinders access to lecture material and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS).

How a student activates note-taking accommodations:

  1. Schedule an appointment with the instructor early in the quarter to discuss note-taking and other accommodations outlined in the Letter of Accommodation (LOA).
  2. Request instructors to read the DSS Note-taking Letter attached to student's LOA; this letter asks for a volunteer classmate to provide copies of lecture notes, without revealing student's name.
  3. If no classmate volunteers are identified, contact DSS and a note-taker will be matched to the class; if an outside Note-taker is determined this can take up to a week to organize.
  4. Students are responsible for self-advocating and for contacting DSS in a timely manner when problems or questions arise about this accommodation.

Please Note: Students who preferred anonymity can arrange to have the note-taker leave the notes with the instructor or the DSS office.

Guidelines for Student Absences

  • Students absent from class will not be provided notes unless otherwise noted on the LOA.
  • It is the student's responsibility to get class notes when they are absent.
  • Note-takers will not stay to take notes for any student who arrives more than 15 minutes late for class or who leaves early unless otherwise noted on the LOA.
  • Students should consider asking a fellow classmate, in advance, to take notes in the event their official note-taker is absent; DSS cannot guarantee coverage if a note-taker is absent.

IMPORTANT: For students who fail to provide a 24-hour notification for more than 3 consecutive school days, note-taking accommodation services may be suspended until they meet with the Director of DSS to discuss their attendance. Reinstatement of suspended accommodation services may not be immediate due to the time required to re-coordinate support staff schedules.

Alternative Format

Disabilities affecting access to printed material may qualify for text (e.g. textbooks, PowerPoint, test etc.) in an alternative format accommodations. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that substantially affects accessing printed material and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS).

Types of Alternative Formats

  • Audio Files
  • Enlarged Material
  • Braille

How a student activates alternative format accommodations:

  1. Turn in Letter of Accommodation Request Form once registered for classes.
  2. Use bookstore list to find required textbooks for classes.
  3. Tell DSS Program Coordinator which books will need to be in alternative format.
  4. DSS Program Coordinator will contact student via email when alternative texts are ready.
  5. Purchase textbooks; DSS must receive a copy of the purchase receipt before students can receive text in alternative format.
  6. Sign Agreement on the Use of Recorded, Electronic or Other Alternatively Formatted Course Materials.

Please Note: When alternative format is needed for lecture material (e.g. PowerPoint, articles, handouts, etc.) contact the DSS Program Coordinator.

Interpreters

Disabilities affecting access to audio or visual course material such as lectures, group discussions, campus activities, and/or meetings with instructors may qualify for interpreting services. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that substantially affects audio or visual access and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS).

How a student activates interpreting accommodations:

  1. Each quarter turn in Letter of Accommodation Request Form as soon as registeration for classes is completed.
  2. Once a LOA Request Form has been submitted, DSS will organize and match interpreters for the student's classes.
  3. Students are responsible for self-advocating and for contacting DSS in a timely manner when problems or questions arise about this accommodation.

Please Note: To guarantee interpreters availability for classes, it is necessary for students to give advanced notice (i.e. 2 to 4 weeks) to DSS. If adequate time is not given students need to understand the limitations of timely recruitment of interpreters.

Requesting Interpreters outside of the classroom

  • At times students will need to meet with instructors, work on group projects, attending campus activities, etc. When an interpreter is needed outside the classroom for any college funded activity or event, students need to make requests with DSS 3 days in advance.

Cancelation of an Interpreter

  • If it becomes necessary to cancel an Interpreter for a class due to illness or other reasons a 24 hour notification is required.

IMPORTANT: For students who fail to provide a 24-hour notification for more than 3 consecutive school days, interpreting services may be suspended until they meet with the Director of DSS to discuss their attendance. Reinstatement of suspended accommodation services may not be immediate due to the time required to re-coordinate support staff schedules.

Scribe

Disabilities affecting writing may qualify for a scribe in class and/or tests. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that substantially affects writing and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS).

How a student activates scribing accommodations:

  1. Each quarter turn in Letter of Accommodation Request Form as soon as registeration for classes is completed.
  2. Once a LOA Request Form has been received by DSS, a DSS scribe will be assigned to the student's classes.
  3. Students are responsible for self-advocating and for contacting DSS in a timely manner when problems or questions arise about this accommodation.

Please Note: To guarantee scribes availability for classes, it is necessary for students to give advanced noticed (i.e. 1 to 2 weeks) to DSS. If adequate time is not given students need to understand the limitations of timely recruitment of scribes.

Guidelines for Student Absences

  • Scribes will not stay for any student who arrives more than 15 minutes late for class.
  • If DSS is given advance notice that a scribe will be absent, the student and instructor will be notified via email by DSS; however, DSS cannot guarantee coverage if a scribe is absent.
  • Students and instructors should develop a plan in advance in the event the DSS scribe is absent.

IMPORTANT: For students who fail to provide a 24-hour notification for more than 3 consecutive school days, scribing accommodation services may be suspended until they meet with the Director of DSS to discuss their attendance. Reinstatement of suspended accommodation services may not be immediate due to the time required to re-coordinate support staff schedules.

Priority Registration

Priority or early registration is provided for students who access time-sensitive accommodations such as textbooks on tape, interpreter or CART services, classroom locations to be located near each other, etc. Not all students qualify for priority registration. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding diagnosis that supports time-sensitive accommodations and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS). DSS will notify the student via their Green River student email with the date they may register for classes each quarter.

Supportive Chairs

Disabilities or other conditions that affect sitting in class may qualify for the use of a supportive chair. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that substantially affects sitting and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS).

Once a student has submitted an LOA Request Form DSS will organize Supportive Chair placement in the student's classes.

Assistive Software

SoftwareDescriptionLocation
JAWS 13.0 Screen-reading software that provides audio input of what is visually shown on the computer screen. DSS computers in  TC Lab, HL Lab
Dragon Naturally Speaking 11.5 Voice recognition software translates speech into type and/or commands for the computer and word processing. Before Dragon can be used the individual will need to train the software to recognize their voice (takes about 30 minutes). DSS computers in TC Lab, HL Lab, ZWC 115, DSS Laptops
ZoomText 9.1 Features magnification, screen reading, and scanning with Optical Character Recognition (OCR). DSS computers in ZWC 115, HL Lab

Assistive Technology

Disabilities affecting learning may qualify to access Assistive Technology. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation supporting the use of assistive technology due to a diagnosis that substantially affects learning and complete an Intake Interview with the director of Disability Support Services (DSS). Assistive Technology can be checked out from DSS.

TechnologyDescription
Ergonomic Keyboard Keyboard constructed in a V shape, to allow right and left hands to type at a slight angle more natural to the human form.
FM System The personal FM system consists of a transmitter microphone used by the speaker (such as the teacher in the classroom, or the speaker at a lecture) and a receiver used by the student, the listener. The receiver transmits the sound to the student's ears or , if you wear a hearing aid, directly to the hearing aid.
Digital Recorder Digital Recorders allow students to record and download the recording to a computer or burn to a CD. The recorders may be used with a PC (Windows) or Macs.
Victor Reader DAISY-MP3 and NISO handheld audio book reader, music player, and digital audio recorder.
Laptop Contain Dragon Naturally Speaking, Microsoft Office, and JAWS.
Rollerball Mouse Ergonomically designed featuring a scrolling wheel and a large detachable ball.
Alpha Smart Pro Portable note-taking devices consist of a standard keyboard and small screen. Student can type notes using the keyboard or by writing with the Dana stylus directly onto the screen. They are easy to use and can be very handy for taking class notes. Cables are available to download files to your computer for printing.
Keyboarding By Ability A touch-type program custom designed to teach individuals to type with one hand.

Equipment Loan

To check out loanable equipment, students are required to fill out the DSS Equipment and/or DSS Material Check-Out Form. The form states the rules for checking out the equipment, and the consequences should the equipment not be turned in on time or in working order.

Please Note: Students' Green River records will be blocked until items are returned to DSS in good working condition or a replacement is paid for. If transaction is not reconciled at the end of the quarter immediately following the checkout quarter, a bill for the amount of replacement will be sent to a collection agency.

Equipment or material checkout/loan service is for the CURRENT quarter only.

Temporary Requests for Accommodations

On a case by case basis, a temporary Letter of Accommodation (LOA) is given to students who have a documented temporary diagnosis. Students must provide Disability Support Services (DSS) with documentation and complete an Intake Interview with the director of DSS to recieve a temporary LOA.

Parking

Green River has a number of designated accessible parking spaces located throughout the campus. Students using those designated spaces MUST have a disabled-parking permit, which is issued by the DMV. If those designated spaces are not available, then the student with the DMV permit may park in Staff parking or contact Campus Safety at 253.833.9111 ext. 3350.

Parking LotNumber of Accessible Parking Stalls
P1 18
P2 11
P3 8
P6 under construction
P9 5
P12 3
P16 4

Temporary Accessible Parking

Disabilities affecting access to campus and parking may qualify for a limited parking permit. Students are to provide historical and/or recent documentation regarding the diagnosis that substantially affects parking and campus access and completed an Intake Interview with the director of DSS.

These parking permits are issued quarterly by DSS and allow the student to park in Staff Parking spaces. These permits are NOT acceptable for the state disabled parking spaces.

Faculty

What is the Instructor's responsibility with academic accommodations?

  • Review Letter of Accommodation (LOA) with student for application and reasonableness with course curriculum.
  • Provide the college authorized accommodations as outlined by Disability Support Services (DSS) in the LOA.
  • Discuss with each student having a LOA, methods for providing and coordinating accommodation(s) in specific situations/classes.
  • Consult DSS regarding questions about a student's accommodations.
  • Maintain confidentiality when speaking with students regarding LOA (i.e. do not speak with student in front of classmates; have conversations before and/or after class or during instructor's office hours).

What is Disability Support Services (DSS) responsibility in helping a student receive academic accommodations?

  • Answer students' questions about DSS and accommodations; and provide orientation packet.
  • Once documentation is received from student and/or outside medical provider review documentation of a disability.
  • Meet with student and complete an Intake Interview to assess and identify reasonable accommodations.
  • Develop LOA with the student for distribution to each course instructor.
  • Upon request, help students and instructors with the coordination of accommodation.
  • Serve as an advocate for the college and students to ensure equal opportunity and equal access are available through reasonable accommodations in the classroom, with testing, and all college programs and activities.

What is the Student's responsibility when receiving academic accommodations?

  • Contact DSS to request accommodations for a documented disability.
  • Provide historical and/or recent documentation that diagnoses the disability and supports requested reasonable accommodations.
  • Complete an Intake Interview.
  • Complete a Letter of Accommodation (LOA) Request Form each quarter.
  • Activate LOA with each instructor and provide a copy of the LOA.
  • Discuss and work with each instructor to determine the best method of executing the authorized accommodation with course curriculum.
  • Self-advocate and contact instructor with concerns and questions that arise about accommodations or academic progress. Contact DSS if additional collaboration is required.

What is a "reasonable accommodation"?

Under the Americans with Disability Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, a reasonable accommodation will be implemented as long as it is medically necessary (there is competent medical evidence establishing a relationship between the disability and the need for accommodation) and the accommodation does not impose an undue financial hardship or burden; does not pose a direct threat to the health or safety of others; and does not make a substantial change in an essential element of the curriculum or a substantial alteration in the manner in which the service is provided.

The goal of reasonable accommodation is to give students with a disability the opportunity to demonstrate abilities and equal access to the learning environment. Individualized accommodations are not designed to give the student an advantage over other students, to alter a fundamental aspect of the course, or weaken academic integrity.

Accommodations for students are tailored on a case by case basis to the individual and the documented disability.

Are there unreasonable accommodations?

"Undue Hardship"...

There are three kinds of accommodations that are not considered reasonable:

  1. If making the accommodation or allowing participation poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others.
  2. If making the accommodation means making a substantial change in an essential element of the curriculum or a substantial alteration in the manner in which you provide your services.
  3. If it poses an undue financial or administrative burden.

What is the procedure for Implementing Test Taking Accommodations?

  1. Student activates Letter of Accommodation (LOA) by providing a copy and discussing accommodations with the instructor.
  2. 3 to 4 days before the exam the student requests testing accommodations with the instructor (e.g. alternative test site, scribe, reader, large print, braille, etc.).
  3. 3 to 4 days before the exam the student organizes testing accommodations with Disability Support Services (DSS) (e.g. alternative test site, scribe, reader, large print, braille, etc.).
  4. If the student is using an alternative test site the student confirms with the instructor the date and time they are scheduled to take the exam.
  5. Instructor completes a Special Exam Instruction Form for the Testing Center and includes it with exam if the student is using an alternative test site.
  6. Instructor arranges the delivery and retrieving of the exam from the Testing Center.

Note: If the student does not show up at the appointed time, he/she will need to work with the instructor to reschedule the exam with the instructor. Or if the test is not at the Testing Center, the student contacts the instructor and DSS to reschedule the test date.

When Large Print Version is needed:

When a student requests large print, the instructor should contact the DSS Office to arrange delivery of the standard print exam for enlarging. It takes the DSS Office a day or two to complete the enlargement, but a lead-time of one week is most helpful. In many cases, the most effective solution involves the DSS Office providing the instructor with a small amount of instruction on producing large print via a standard copy machine or laser printer. In this case, the student should inform the instructor about the specifics of an effective enlargement.

When Braille is needed:

If a student needs Braille for a test, the faculty member should contact the DSS Office to work together to arrange its production. At least four weeks advance notice will be required for Brailing (more may be required for technical material). If the test or quiz is available on computer disk, the process of "Brailing" the test may take less time (two to three weeks lead time is usually sufficient with a week being preferred). However, if the test is only available in paper form, the production time can be up to five weeks. The key factor when planning for Braille testing is the lead-time. In addition and in most cases, Braille testing also involves a need for the student to schedule a scribe for recording answers.

Use of Large Print and Braille may also require extended time for exam completion.

What is the Special Exam Instruction Form?

Instructors complete a Special Exam Instruction Form when a student with accommodations is taking the exam in the Testing Center. This form indicates which testing accommodation(s) the Testing Center should implement for the student.

What is the deadline for students to ask for accommodations?

There is no deadline for students to contact Disability Support Services (DSS). Although students are encouraged to contact DSS prior to any quarter, they may register with DSS or request their LOA any time throughout the quarter.

What is Green River Non-Discrimination Policy?

"Green River Community College is committed to the principle of equal opportunity in education and employment. The college does not discriminate against individuals on the basis of race, creed, color, national origin, sex (including sexual harassment), sexual orientation, age, marital status, religion, disability, genetic information or on any other unlawful basis. The college is committed to preventing and stopping discrimination, including harassment, on any of these unlawful bases, and any associated retaliatory behavior. All employees and students must be allowed to work and learn in an environment free from discrimination. The College will comply with applicable laws prohibiting discrimination in employment, educational programs, and admissions, including Titles VII and IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the state law against discrimination, chapter 49.60 RCW." Human Resources -- Nondiscrimination Policies & Discrimination Complaint Procedures, HR-22

Is it the Instructor or the college's responsibility to accommodate the student's disability?

Instructors, Disability Support Services (DSS), Counseling Services, IT, Enrollment Services, Financial Aid, etc., are "the college" and work in partnership with authorized accommodations. Disability law is clear that colleges must provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. DSS is responsible for identifying what accommodations are necessary so students with disabilities are not unfairly restricted, limited or discriminated by the impact of the disability.

Some accommodations will be provided by instructors i.e. providing large print, making notes available, allowing use of recorders, preferential seating, and flexibility in attendance, etc. Other accommodations will be coordinated by DSS i.e. brailing, captioning, matching up interpreters, providing written material in alternative format, quiet rooms for test, etc.

Why are there different types of accommodations?

Accommodations are tailored to the student's documented disability on a case by case basis. The impact of a disability is different for each individual.

Should an instructor include a statement for students with disabilities on their syllabus?

DSS, along with the Instructional Council recommends that each course syllabus contain a statement reflecting compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, Section 504. Please use the following statement:

If you believe you qualify for course adaptations or special accommodations under the Americans With Disabilities Act, it is your responsibility to contact the Disability Support Services Coordinator in the LSC and provide the appropriate documentation. If you have already documented a disability or other condition through the Green River's Disability Support Services Office, which would qualify you for special accommodations, or if you have emergency medical information or special needs I should know about, please notify me during the first week of class. You can reach me by phone at 253-833-9111, extension ______. Or, you can schedule an office appointment to meet me in the ____ Office Building, office number ____ during my posted office hours or at another mutually determined time. If this location is not convenient for you, we will schedule an alternative place for the meeting. If you use an alternative medium for communicating, let me know well in advance of the meeting (at least one week) so that appropriate accommodations can be arranged.

It would be helpful if you draw attention to the DSS statement on the day you introduce the syllabus. Please do not have students discuss their specific needs within the hearing of other students. Please arrange to meet with the student outside of class time.

Does DSS give presentations?

Campus Access/Resources

Auburn Main Campus Map

12401 SE 320th Street
Auburn, WA 98092-3622

Click here to access Auburn Main campus map with Accessible Parking and Entrances into buildings. If you cannot find accessible parking contact Campus Safety via phone: 253-288-3350 or in person in the Administration Building.

Click here for more information about accessible parking permits.

Parking LotNumber of Accessible Parking Stalls
P1 18
P2 11
P3 8
P6 11
P9 5
P12 3
P16 4

Inclement Weather: Green River sends out emails, texts, tweets, and facebook with weather updates. Additionally, signs will be posted navigating students to accessible pathways. However, if a student experiences difficulties getting around campus due to snow or ice conditions, please contact Campus Safety (253.833.9111 ext. 3350) or DSS (253.833.9111 ext. 2631).

Kent Campus

417 Ramsay Way, Suite 112
Kent, WA 98032
Phone: (253) 288-3400
Fax: (253) 288-3485

Click here to access Kent Campus website

Enumclaw Campus

1414 Griffin Avenue
Enumclaw, WA 98022
Phone: (253) 856-9595

Click here to access Enumclaw Campus website

Service Animals

Click here for information regarding service animals

Transportation Resources

DepartmentWebsite
Washington State Department of Licensing -- Disabled Parking http://www.dol.wa.gov/vehicleregistration/parking.html
King County Metro http://kingcounty.gov/
King County Metro Access http://metro.kingcounty.gov/tops/accessible/accessvan.html
Pierce County http://www.piercetransit.org/
Sound Transit http://www.soundtransit.org/
Sound Transit Accessibility http://www.soundtransit.org/Rider-Guide/Accessibility.xml

Disability Resource List

Click here to access Disability Resource List that provides names of individuals, agencies, and clinics that provide services to individuals with ADHD, learning and/or psychological disabilities.

State Disability Resources

Internship and Employment Resources

There are many work-based experiences or internship opportunities available for students with disabilities. Below is a list of various resources for perspective and current college students with disabilities.

For assistance with writing résumés, cover letters, job search strategies, and preparing and practicing for interviews contact Green River's Hireworks (253) 833-9111, ext. 2550; LSC 225.

ResourceWebsite
National Center on Secondary Education and Transition http://www.ncset.org/default.asp
Do-IT Access http://www.washington.edu/doit/
EntryPoint!/ACCESS http://ehrweb01.aaas.org/entrypoint/
Workforce Recruitment Program http://www.dol.gov/odep/wrp/
The Washington Center: Scholarships for Students with disabilities http://www.twc.edu/internships/learn-more/funding/scholarship-opportunities#disabilities-scholarships
United States Department of Labor http://www.dol.gov/odep/
JobAccess http://www.jobaccess.org/
AbilityLinks http://www.abilitylinks.org/
National Business and Disability Council http://www.business-disability.com/
RecruitABILITY https://www.disabledperson.com/
Disability.Gov https://www.disability.gov/
Washington State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) http://www.dshs.wa.gov/dvr/
National Organization on Disability http://www.nod.org
Career Opportunities for Students with Disabilities http://www.cosdonline.org
Getting Hired http://www.gettinghired.com
Job Accommodation Network http://www.askjan.org

American with Disability Act (ADA)

Sec. 12102. Definition of disability

(1) Disability

The term "disability" means, with respect to an individual

(A) a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities of such individual;

(B) a record of such an impairment; or

(C) being regarded as having such an impairment (as described in paragraph (3)).

(2) Major Life Activities

(A) In general

For purposes of paragraph (1), major life activities include, but are not limited to, caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, seeing, hearing, eating, sleeping, walking, standing, lifting, bending, speaking, breathing, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating, and working.

(B) Major bodily functions

For purposes of paragraph (1), a major life activity also includes the operation of a major bodily function, including but not limited to, functions of the immune system, normal cell growth, digestive, bowel, bladder, neurological, brain, respiratory, circulatory, endocrine, and reproductive functions.

http://www.ada.gov/pubs/adastatute08.htm#12102

http://www.ada.gov/

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

"No otherwise qualified handicapped individual in the United States ...shall, solely by reason of his handicap, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance."

http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/civilrights/resources/factsheets/504.pdf

http://www.dol.gov/oasam/regs/statutes/sec504.htm

Reasonable Accommodation: Appeals & Grievances

When initiating the appeal process, it is presumed that the student will have made a good faith effort and worked with the individual faculty or staff, division chair, dean's offices, and/or committees involved to try and resolve accommodation concerns. During these efforts, students may request the assistance of the DSS Director to help navigate the process. After exhausting all attempts to resolve issues through different pathways, and if the student believes that his/her accommodation concerns are still not being met, then the student may utilize the following appeal process:

If a student believes that the DSS Director has not provided reasonable, appropriate accommodations, or if the student believes that some individual, office, or committee of the institution has failed to appropriately accommodate his/her needs, or has in some way discriminated on the basis of disability, then the student has a right to appeal.

  1. The student shall submit a written appeal to the Vice President of Student Services outlining the factual basis and rationale of the appeal.
  2. Within thirty (30) instructional days or as soon thereafter as practicable, the Vice President of Student Services will review the appeal and make recommendations in writing for appropriate resolution.
  3. If a satisfactory resolution is not reached, the student may present his/her appeal to the ADA Compliance Officer (Vice President of Human Resources).
  4. The ADA Compliance Officer shall respond in writing within thirty (30) instructional days of the receipt of the appeal. The decision of the ADA Compliance Officer is the final decision of the institution.

If a student has a grievance and would like to go outside the College for resolution, s/he may wish to contact:

Seattle OfficeOlympia Headquarters Office
Office of Civil Rights
U.S. Department of Education
915 Second Avenue, Room 3310
Seattle, WA 98174-109
Phone: 206-607-1600
TDD: 206-607-1647
Fax: 206-607-1601
E-mail: OCR.Seattle@ed.gov
WA State Human Rights Commission
Olympia Headquarters Office
711 S. Capitol Way, Suite 402
Olympia, WA 98504-2490
Phone: 360-753-6770
Toll Free: 1-800-233-3247
TTY: 1-800-300-7525
Fax: 360-586-2282

Click here a printable version.

Arranging for Green River's Entrance Test Accommodation

Prospective or admitted students requesting accommodations for the placement test (either COMPASS or ASSET) must provide Disability Support Services (DSS) with documentation that supports the need for accommodation (e.g. reader, scribe, use of calculator, etc). Such documentation needs to be provided to the DSS Director in advance of the placement testing date. Five (5) working days are recommended to allow for assessment and coordination of services.

After documentation has been provided, and appropriate time allowed for assessment and coordination, contact DSS to schedule an appointment to take the placement test with accommodations.

Note: The COMPASS assessment helps place you in the proper reading, writing, and math course. It is not a pass or fail test.

Arranging for GED® Test Accommodations

Students requesting accommodations for the GED® test should make arrangements to meet with the GED® Chief Examiner to obtain necessary guidelines and paperwork. The GED® Chief Examiner, Debbie Lynes, can be reached by the following:

  • Main number: (253) 833-9111, ext. 2657
  • Greater Eastside: (206) 464-6133, ext. 2657
  • Tacoma: (253) 924-0180, ext. 2657
  • dlynes@greenriver.edu

The GED® testing procedures are exact and follow rigid federal and state standardized requirements; GED® testing procedures require that certain forms need to be completed by a qualifying professional. Please see the GED® Website for more information.

http://www.sbctc.ctc.edu/public/_y_gedaccommodationsrequests.aspx

Hours of Operation

See all college hours »

Contact Us

StaffPhoneOffice
DSS Main Office 253.833.9111 ext. 2631 LSC 274
Jamie Hatleberg, Director 253.833.9111 ext. 2646 LSC 272
Jean Carlson, Program Coordinator
253.833.9111 ext. 2318 LSC 271A
Sarah Franz, DSS Educational Planner 253.833.9111 ext. 2668 / 253.245.3615  (VP) LSC 274
TDD 253.288.3359
Fax 253.288.3471

DSS is located in the Lindbloom Student Center, 2nd Floor, Room 271A. Elevator access to the second floor is located in the northwest corner of the Lindbloom Student Center outside of the Papertree Bookstore. If accommodations are needed for a visit (e.g. ASL Interpreters) please contact DSS at least a week in advance.

DSS Mailing Address

Green River Community College
Attn: Disability Support Services
12401 SE 320th St.
Auburn, WA. 98092-3699

It is Green River Community College's Policy to provide reasonable accommodations for individuals with disabilities with advance notice of need. If an accommodation is needed for any reason, please contact DSS.